Travel Body Scanners at Airports

Nov. 19, 2010

The security agency for the U.S. airports began using the newly installed body scanner devices this past week. Whether or not they’re useful to detect certain materials that will protect passengers, remains questionable. Some scientist have stated there is a high potential for basil cell carcinoma (skin cancer), particularly for frequent flyers and children. It’s recommended to give this some thought before participating.
The other options are the metal detector and personal pat-downs. Whatever security procedure is used, either nude scanner pictures or pat-downs are involved before many U.S. travelers are allowed on planes. The choice of security measure used is at the discretion of the technician screening the traveler at the time.
Total travelers each month in 2008 averaged approx. 72 million domestic and international.

The total number of travelers hiding an explosive material each month is 0.

The total number of flights per month is approx. one million, primarily within the U.S.

Total number of explosive materials found on board airplanes per month is 0.

It’s been reported that the cost of each body scanner is 136,500 dollars, with additional costs of training and salaries, to include also, lawsuits against the transportation security for privacy and health violations.

Security claimed last year that the machines can neither store nor transmit the images, but officials later admitted that the agency required manufacturers to include those functions for testing, training and evaluation purposes. Therefore, all the naked images of travelers who are screened by the x-ray detector devices can be saved in a database, the extent of which depends on the computer program installed.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center has filed a lawsuit demanding a federal judge to put a stop on the transportation security’s scanning program. The group’s director said, “This is the dept of homeland sec. subjecting every U.S. traveler to an intrusive search that can be recorded without any suspicion”.

X-ray screeners use  ‘focused ionized’ radiation, the effects of which are unknown, particularly for pregnant women and children. The natural type of radiation travelers are exposed to on airplanes is ‘diffuse’. Diffuse radiation is less adverse in comparison to focused and is contrary to the claim a head official made in the media when he stated that the radiation level received during screening (focused) was the same as two minutes in an airplane (diffuse).

Radiation damage is cumulative and each successive dose builds on the cellular mutation caused by the last. The dose may be up to twenty times higher than first estimated. The opinion of many scientists states that the scanner radiation has been under-estimated. Can we measure the risk of a possible terrorist attack against that of basal cell carcinoma and leukemia? It can take years for radiation damage to manifest pathology; damage and alterations to the dna structure is also in question, as well as causing infertility for generations. Scanners used at the airport specifically focus on the skin and muscle tissue immediately beneath the skin which would include tiny and small blood vessels.

Neither the liquid material of flight 253, nor the December ’09 powder form are likely to be detected by the new x-ray scanners. There is no longer any way possible that anyone can travel by airplane in a safe and dignified manner without getting personally violated. Physical and emotional injury is of a magnitude that far outweighs the reality of the situation, to include also the injurious expense on tax dollars requires further investigation.

The manufacturer of the scanner devices that have been installed is none other than a head person of the security organization itself which causes the sale and purchase aspect strongly appear as a ‘conflict of interest’ and reason enough to consider other options and alternatives.  The full-body scanners appear to have been a derivative product hedged as a future contract by a member in a position of authority in a department of the same government at the time of agreement. This scanning program has the capacity to compile an enormously massive database of very personal profiles on a daily basis very similar to models that have already been in use in penitentiaries.

The potential risk for adverse effects to skin tissue, and the vascular and muscular systems directly beneath the skin, are high; not only in the immediate sense, but effects that extend far into the future due to a latency period. Radiation exposure may cause any number of various kinds of disabilities.

Astrolivia

Advertisements